John Eli

John Eli has spent over 15 years mentoring and coaching individuals in life skills, career transitions, and through organizational change. He has worked in behavioral health, pastoral care, and higher-education. He has found that he is most satisfied in life when he is helping people recognize their potential and assisting them to reach their goals.

He currently lives in Chandler, Arizona with his wife, mini-schnauzer and an antique piano whom he calls, ā€œBetty.ā€

5 Comments

  1. I would say that more than half of my working life was working for one abusive boss or another. Now that I am retired, I do not miss the daily grind at all. I only had one encounter, similar to what you said, that stopped the abuse. My boss was a former captain in the Army, as was I. Thus, he expected more from me than the other guys, and the two ladies. Without a pay raise or promotion, I became his second in command. He put his hands to my throat once, and an officer of the company pulled him off. No need for a law suit. Suddenly, no one could remember that event ever happening – thus it was a culture at the company.. There was physical, emotional, and verbal abuse. I was responsible for my 3-4 projects and regarding budget, everyone else’s projects. I had one project that was ready to be sent to the customer, a computer-based training program with videos and audios on CD. He came to my desk and screamed so that everyone could hear that I had five errors within the first two minutes of course time. He demanded an explanation. I did not make eye contact. I did not raise my voice. In fact, I whispered so that only he could hear, almost. I said, “I cannot do it. What you are asking me to do is read your mind. There are only one or two errors in the entire CD, 10 hours of instruction. A word that was mispronounced, but with different colloquial manners of speech, that error is acceptable. One pause in audio is too long, another is too short? That is all subjective. I will fix what I think are worthy corrections, but I cannot put up with this any longer.” He did not even grunt. He just went back to his office. The oldest guy in the group heard a little of what I said and told me to get a bully to back off, you had to punch him in the nose. But I didn’t have to. He never apologized, but he never got angry at me enough to voice it. After that encounter, he trusted me – having me to the final review before publishing instead of him for every project in the group, including my own. I had stood my ground, on my terms, and he accepted it. I still would have liked a pay raise. Thanks for you suggestion.

    Liked by 1 person

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